Jamie DeWolf, Scientology Founder's Great-Grandson says that the Church of Scientology is one of the most “devious, systematic brainwashing systems that’s ever been invented.”

Jamie DeWolf, Scientology Founder’s Great-Grandson says that the Church of Scientology is one of the most “devious, systematic brainwashing systems that’s ever been invented.”

Robert Robinson at World Cult Watch has posted an article by Monica Pignotti, MSW, PhD, titled The Use of Mind Control in Scientology. The peace loving folks at Scientology apparently didn’t care much for the article and participated in one of the many smear campaigns launched against him (which is what they do with most of their detractors). Monica writes of that effort here on her blog from 2012.

Back to the article … as it does not appear copyrighted, so we will post in its entirety here if there is not an objection from Ms Pignotti or Mr. Robinson:

PART I

THE BEGINNING INDOCTRINATION METHODS

The purpose of this paper is to show how mind control is used in Scientology. In order to do this, I have used the four components of mind control from Steve Hassan’s Combatting Cult Mind Control: Behavior control, Emotional control, Thought control and Information control and have given examples of how Scientology uses each of these. I am assuming that the reader of this paper has read and is familiar with the concepts outlined in this book.

This is not meant to be an exhaustive study of mind control techniques in Scientology, as that could fill an entire book! This is just to give you a start in getting an understanding of how mind control is used at the very beginning levels of Scientology. If a person gets more deeply involved, for instance, and gets into auditing, joins staff and/or does advanced courses, there is much more. I will be writing papers to deal with these issues. The techniques I discuss here, however, have proved quite sufficient, unfortunately, to get many people hooked into Scientology.

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Talk about your inbred social media plan!!

Talk about your inbred social media plan!!

Folks, the Internet reveals a lot when it comes to the legitimacy of organizations. When you see a Twitter account like most, if not ALL, of Scientology’s accounts, it’s easy to see that wall of separation they’ve established between themselves and the “outside world.” what could possibly be the reason for following a mere 17 other accounts? Well, it’s time for the truth (and we know it’s true because it’s true for us), they’re merely following themselves!!

I mean, come on people … that’s just social media inbreeding. Do you people realize what you look like?

The Scientology Social Media Plan ... WE LIKES US!

The Scientology Social Media Plan … WE LIKES US!

One tweet since 2011 ... you guys want to tell us something. This is LA for goodness sake.

One tweet since 2011 … you guys want to tell us something. This is LA for goodness sake.

Apparently, Scientology in Los Angeles hasn’t filled that Twitter manager slot that opened up on April 23rd, 2011. Gee … was it something he said?

And like all of the other official Twitter accounts, they only follow themselves. Stay tuned for more reports on their special brand of inbreeding on the social media scene.

Within Scientology, if a Scientologist sees another Scientologist doing something that the organization would consider wrong, they have to write up what’s called a Knowledge Report. It is one way in which the Church of Scientology — a destructive cult known for, among other crimes, its manifold human rights abuses — keep control over its members. Everyone is closely watched by everyone else. Strangers, friends, and even family members will write up Knowledge Reports about each other.

Within Scientology, if a Scientologist sees another Scientologist doing something that the organization would consider wrong, they have to write up what’s called a Knowledge Report. It is one way in which the Church of Scientology — a destructive cult known for, among other crimes, its manifold human rights abuses — keep control over its members. Everyone is closely watched by everyone else. Strangers, friends, and even family members will write up Knowledge Reports about each other.

Knowledge Report nears completion.

Emmy-winning journalist Mark Bunker has been in radio, television and dramatic productions for years. Beginning in 1997, he began using his skills to bring attention to the abuses and lawless behind the scenes behavior of the cult of Scientology. His web site, XENU TV is an excellent source of information on Scientology. Mark says of his work…

I was introduced to Scientology back in the 1980’s by “60 Minutes.” They did two terrific reports, in 1980 and 1985, which showed the impact this organization had on the small town of Clearwater, Florida. It was a very chilling story which showed a sleepy beach community, made up primarily of retirees, being invaded and occupied by a paramilitary organization disguised as a church.

Those are harsh words but when you look at the actions Scientology took upon entering Clearwater, they are accurate. Scientology files uncovered in FBI raids in Los Angeles and Washington provided a detailed look at the covert operations Scientology ran to target their enemies and destroy them, including attacks on the mayor of the city, Gabe Cazares.

This was a fascinating story. How could a religion setup a mayor with a phony hit-and run accident? How could a religion setup journalist Paulette Cooper in a phony UN bomb threat which cost her her job, her friends and almost her freedom? Luckily the FBI raids happened before she was to stand trial and the whole sordid Scientology plan called “Operation Freakout” was uncovered and exposed.

What kind of religion behaved this way? The answer was a phony religion created by a science fiction writer to enrich his own coffers. “MAKE MONEY. MAKE MORE MONEY. MAKE OTHER PEOPLE PRODUCE SO AS TO MAKE MORE MONEY,” were the exact words in Hubbard Communications Office Policy Letter, 9 March 1972, MS OEC 384

But his interest in Scientology didn’t stop with merely finding out about the one of the strange cults that appeared on the news magazine shows of the 70’s and 80’s. His life would change dramatically in 1998.

in 1998 when I moved into a home in the Loz Feliz hills in Los Angeles which had been rented before me by a Scientologist. She apparently split without giving Scientology a forwarding address because I kept getting Scientology magazines delivered to my door.

In reading the magazines, I was struck by just how much gibberish was involved in even an ad for a strange device called an e-meter. Engrams? Enturbulate? Wog World? Thetan? What the hell are these people talking about? And why are they wearing navy uniforms?

By then I had been living in L.A. for over a decade and had passed the Scientology properties without giving them much thought. However, where once my interest in the subject was piqued by a TV broadcast and would fade when the reports died down, now there was a miraculous thing called the internet.

I started doing research and was stunned by what I uncovered. Court documents, confessions from former members and info on the super secret upper levels of Scientology which were said by Hubbard to kill you through pneumonia if you weren’t properly prepared before being exposed to them.

I took the chance and you know what? I survived. I learned all about the evil intergalactic overlord named Xenu. He stuffed us into volcanoes 75 million years ago and blew us all up with hydrogen bombs far more powerful then those we have today.

Which brings us to “Knowledge Report, the movie.” This will be Mark’s first feature film. Production is nearly finished and the film should be a terrific exposé on the inner workings of the Church of Scientology. Stay tuned to his YouTube channel for updates or follow him on Twitter and don’t miss a screening in a theater near you when it is released.

Since the 1950’s Ireland did not have an active Scientology organisation presence until 1987, when the Mission of Dublin was founded. The following extract from a 1988 article in The Star gives the details (and doesn’t hold back): The Church of Scientology has set up shop in the heart of downtown Dublin. A mind-bending cult based on science fiction, it has been described as “corrupt, immoral and dangerous” by a British High Court Judge.

Since the 1950’s Ireland did not have an active Scientology organisation presence until 1987, when the Mission of Dublin was founded. The following extract from a 1988 article in The Star gives the details (and doesn’t hold back): The Church of Scientology has set up shop in the heart of downtown Dublin. A mind-bending cult based on science fiction, it has been described as “corrupt, immoral and dangerous” by a British High Court Judge.

PUT TO THE TEST. Just in from Jane Fallon Griffin, Senior Staff Writer at the University Times, the student newspaper of Trinity College Dublin.

Scientology in Ireland has a little different look and feel than in other parts of the world.

… Church of Scientology has succeeded in extending its influence to Ireland. Here, however, it has the status of a mission, rather than that of a religion which it holds in America, Australia and Argentina. Abbey Street is home to the Irish branch of the church, with its office located above a hairdresser, flanked by a traditional Irish music shop and a travel agent. The attention received by Scientology in Ireland is very much confined to its testing in its Dublin headquarters and the protests of those who aim to restrict any further influence by the Scientologists: Anonymous Ireland.

Jane moved into temporary quarters next door to a Church of Scientology while working in Boston, MA here in the U.S. and became a little curious about the organization.

During my three months living next door to the church, there was a constant flurry of activity in the adjoining house. Curious, I often stood outside contemplating investigating this free personality test and the Dianetics book which was sold alongside the People and O magazines in our local newsagent.  I wanted to go in. My travel companions were vehemently against the mere thought of it.

When she returned home to Dublin, the urge to check out the CoS was just too much for this budding investigative student journalist.

While I waited to be presented with the 200-question test, the Scientologist asked me what I was doing. I answered I was a student but he proceeded to enquire about what job I had, which I found a little bit unusual. When it came to the test, some questions became more thought provoking and frankly somewhat disturbing … I began the questionnaire considering carefully each sentence yet as I progressed through the sheet I found myself more uncomfortable.

Perhaps we should yell, “Jane, get out now before it’s too late!” But she would have none of that. And, of course, this is what you would expect when the results of the “Test” were presented.

In categories such as “happiness” I didn’t fare well, nor in “organisation”, nor “criticism”, nor much else for that matter. In many of them I was below the dotted line which, according to the chart, indicated that my need for attention was “urgent.” I looked at the sheet while he read out each individual result and couldn’t help but think that this personality must belong to someone else. He stopped talking and asked me if I agreed. I tried to be polite, saying that there may have been a few inaccuracies, but on further prompting I told him I disagreed with most of it.

We can report that there is a happy ending to the story, as Jane escaped with all of her senses. This is how the final chapter should read for ANYONE interested in the cult of Scientology…

Interesting as I found the experience, my gut feeling descending the stairs was not to attempt any further research into the next stages of membership.

Nicely played Jane … nicely played.

Related stories about Scientology in Ireland:

Ireland is a land of enchantment, excitement and exhilaration. Rich in history, Modern Ireland is ranked as one of the most peaceful, stable and safest places in the world. Let’s hope Scientology dies a final and quick death so the Irish can continue building one of the best all-round standards of living anywhere on the planet.

Ireland is a land of enchantment, excitement and exhilaration. Rich in history, Modern Ireland is ranked as one of the most peaceful, stable and safest places in the world. Let’s hope Scientology dies a final and quick death so the Irish can continue building one of the best all-round standards of living anywhere on the planet.

From Publishers Weekly — The farce continues in this fifth installment of Hubbard's 10-series, Mission Earth. Soltan Gris, the focus here, is the Voltarian Empire's spy chief on Earth. Forever plotting, peeping and trying to manipulate others, double agent Gris is himself the eternal dupe. His crazed schemes to subvert his own agent in the field, virtuous Jettero Heller, keep blowing up in his face. The new chapter, a spoof of free market economics, opens with Gris smuggling 12 tons of goldto pay his credit card bills. Fast-talking bankers soon relieve him of the lucre and he fumes to see Heller raising money for his good deeds from mob-run Atlantic City casinos and commodities trading. This leaden satire gets more outrageous in its sexual aspects, which sound suspiciously like a parody of Scientology.

From Publishers Weekly — The farce continues in this fifth installment of Hubbard’s 10-series, Mission Earth. Soltan Gris, the focus here, is the Voltarian Empire’s spy chief on Earth. Forever plotting, peeping and trying to manipulate others, double agent Gris is himself the eternal dupe. His crazed schemes to subvert his own agent in the field, virtuous Jettero Heller, keep blowing up in his face. The new chapter, a spoof of free market economics, opens with Gris smuggling 12 tons of goldto pay his credit card bills. Fast-talking bankers soon relieve him of the lucre and he fumes to see Heller raising money for his good deeds from mob-run Atlantic City casinos and commodities trading. This leaden satire gets more outrageous in its sexual aspects, which sound suspiciously like a parody of Scientology.

Tony Ortega at The Underground Bunker has found a wonderful video featuring L. Ron Hubbard lecturing in 1954 about something referred to as “Opening Procedure by Duplication, Problems and Solutions and Granting of Beingness.” It is described as follows on Scientology’s Bridge Publications web site:

L. Ron Hubbard had delivered five ACCs at a scorching pace: 317 lectures in 147 days. Despite increased auditor skill, none could match his results. Seeking why, Mr. Hubbard made a crucial discovery—Duplication. “Auditors can’t duplicate. What do you mean, duplicate? That’s just, do the same as. That’s all. Can’t do it. What’s the matter with cases? They can’t duplicate.” Not only is duplication the basic action of existence, but its failure is the primary degeneration of a thetan. Thus Mr. Hubbard taught the solution in Procedure 30, comprising three processes: Problems and Solutions, Granting of Beingness and Opening Procedure by Duplication.

L. Ron Hubbard lectures on Duplication

If you’ve never heard of the phrase, “Psychobabble,” then you’re in for a treat because this is Hubbard at his gobbledygook best presenting information that any thinking person would immediately get up and walk out on. And yes … the longer you read this, the more convoluted it becomes.

Hubbard’s transition from writing goofy science fiction to writing goofy psychological analysis may have caught on with folks whose minds were already wired to accept just about any crazy idea coming down the highway, but for the rest of us it’s just nonsense … pure nonsense.

Oh yes, if you’d like a copy of this lecture series that Hubbard delivered to the 6th American Advanced Clinical Course, it will cost you a cool $550.

Duplication is tremendously important. Tremendously important. It just can’t be overemphasized in a case. —L. Ron Hubbard

So ... was he crazy? Well, here's one of the claims he made on the benefits of Scientology.  Leukemia treatments:  “Leukemia is evidently psychosomatic in origin and at least eight cases of leukemia had been treated successfully by Dianetics after medicine had traditionally given up.  The source of leukaemia has been reported to be an engram containing the phrase 'It turns my blood to water.’ ”

So … was he crazy? Well, here’s one of the claims he made on the benefits of Scientology. Leukemia treatments: “Leukemia is evidently psychosomatic in origin and at least eight cases of leukemia had been treated successfully by Dianetics after medicine had traditionally given up. The source of leukaemia has been reported to be an engram containing the phrase ‘It turns my blood to water.’ ”

The story of Hubbard and the Blackfeet is one that’s been told for years. According to official Scientology biographies, Hubbard, born in 1911, spent a short time on his grandparents’ Kalispell ranch when he was a boy. During that time, he claimed to have befriended a Blackfeet medicine man named “Old Tom” who taught him tribal lore and made him a “blood brother” in a special ceremony.

The story of Hubbard and the Blackfeet is one that’s been told for years. According to official Scientology biographies, Hubbard, born in 1911, spent a short time on his grandparents’ Kalispell ranch when he was a boy. During that time, he claimed to have befriended a Blackfeet medicine man named “Old Tom” who taught him tribal lore and made him a “blood brother” in a special ceremony.

Wacky L. Ron Hubbard … in his own words:

On his Native American upbringing …

It seems L. Ron really, and I mean really, wanted to make it clear that he had some extraordinary credentials when it came to his understanding of spirituality. And what do most of us require in a spiritual leader? Nothing less than full membership in a Native-American tribe.

Lucky for L. Ron, the Blackfoot Indian tribe of Montana recruited him and made him a blood brother in a really cool tribal ceremony that probably featured a whole lot of feathers and peace pipes and dancing and whatnot. And, oh yeah, that was when he was just six years old. Those injuns must have really recognized great perception and timeless wisdom in little L. Ron when he wasn’t crapping his pants.

And then, as if his followers wouldn’t be crapping their pants in excitement over his Blackfeet Indian connections, L. Ron also insists that he spent his adolescence sitting at the feet of shamans of the Orient, eventually applying their ageless wisdom to produce–TA-DA!–Scientology.

But Actually:

L. Ron lived in Helena, Montana when he was four. The nearest Blackfoot Reservation was over 100 miles away. Still, he could have made the trek for the blood brother ceremony … if the Blackfoot tribe ACTUALLY CONDUCTED that sort of ritual. But oops, they didn’t. As our friends at Wikipedia point out:

“The white Blackfeet historian Hugh Dempsey has commented that the act of blood brotherhood was ‘never done among the Blackfeet,’ and Blackfeet Nation officials have disavowed attempts to ‘reestablish’ Hubbard as a ‘blood brother’ of the Blackfeet.”

Hat tip Kristi Harrison, posted at Cracked.com