Archive for the ‘Hubbard’ Category

If Scientology sold hamburgers or any other retail product, they would have been hauled into court long ago for false advertising. But because they have IRS protection as a "church," they can continue their deceptive practices with immunity.

If Scientology sold hamburgers or any other retail product, they would have been hauled into court long ago for false advertising. But because they have IRS protection as a “church,” they can continue their deceptive practices with immunity.

As former Scientologist Arnie Lerma wrote in his 1998 article, The Art of Deception:

Hubbard was master of only one thing, the Art of Deception.

Lerma continues his lengthy dissertation with a history of his 20 year involvement with the deceptive cult and he fully analyzes how L. Ron Hubbard created his masterpiece cult religion. He begins his study with this summary of how he became involved with Scientology in the first place.

After resisting efforts to get involved with Scientology for a considerable period, I finally decided to give it a try. This supposedly wonderful technology of the mind was, after all, developed by a nuclear physicist, in order to cure himself of crippling wounds received during active duty as a highly decorated Navy hero.

Of course 25 years later, sitting amidst piles of documents, including a copy of Hubbard’s official Navy record and a copy of his transcript from George Washington University, I found that the entire premise for Dianetics and its spawn, Scientology is, and has always been, a complete fraud.
Hubbard was neither a war hero, highly decorated, wounded in action, nor a nuclear physicist. His discharge papers reflect the only affliction he seems to have acquired while in the Navy was an urethral discharge.

If the entire stated premise for the creation of Dianetics was a lie, then it follows that everything that comes after it must also be a lie.

In two concise paragraphs, Lerma summarizes the complete “bait and switch” of the entire Scientology enterprise, much like our photo of “Truth in Advertising.”

Dianetics teaches you in grisly detail how this complicated fabrication is constructed. While you think you are learning the “secret” of the human mind, you are instead being set up to swallow Scientology as the ultimate solution for mankind. And of course “ultimate solutions” go on to make otherwise unconscionable acts possible.

The “reactive mind” you are then tricked into creating, or “mocking up” is that very same ‘reactive mind’ that you spend years getting rid of in Scientology.

If you have some considerable time to kill, I would highly recommend reading the balance of Arnie Lerma’s article … it is insightful as it is comprehensive.

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Space Jazz: The soundtrack of the book Battlefield Earth is a music album and soundtrack companion to the novel Battlefield Earth by L. Ron Hubbard, released in 1982. Hubbard composed the music for the album.

Space Jazz: The soundtrack of the book Battlefield Earth is a music album and soundtrack companion to the novel Battlefield Earth by L. Ron Hubbard, released in 1982. Hubbard composed the music for the album.

WHAT WERE YOU THINKING?

In the 80’s, L. Ron Hubbard had gone into hiding … mostly from fear of prosecution by U.S. authorities who had already brought indictments against his wife (who eventually went to prison with two other conspirators in 1979) and 10 other officials in an alleged conspiracy to place the religion’s spies in government agencies, bug government meetings and steal government documents.

One of the things that emerged from this self-imposed sabbatical was Space Jazz, an very strange entry into the rock music world. This article from Slate magazine describes the aftermath:

Musically, the album alternates between canned uplift (“Jonnie”, “Golden Age of Sci-Fi”) and droning dirges, broken up with patches of comic-book dialogue, robot voices, and laser-gun sound effects. A then-new, extremely expensive digital sampling synthesizer called a Fairlight CMI peppers the album; Hubbard seemed to imagine it represents the sound of the future, but it actually sounds more like the rightly discarded mistake of an abandoned past. Even for Battlefield Earth buffs like myself, Space Jazz is less a guilty pleasure than a harrowing endurance test. With Space Jazz, L. Ron Hubbard set out to re-create Battlefield Earth as a purely sonic experience. He succeeded all too well.

Less about real music and more like “What should I do with all this free time I’ve got on my hands,” Hubbard proved again in a period of time just preceding his passing that he was nothing more than a professional dabbler in weirdness.

The Slate article is very interesting … make sure you give it a read!

The real science behind Scientology seems to be an understanding of the very human need, as social animals, to be part of a supportive group—and the willingness of people to pay handsomely for it. (Scientific American: The Real Science behind Scientology, by Michael Shermer, Oct 12, 2011).

DID HUBBARD MISS HIS REAL CALLING AS A WHITE WITCH DOCTOR? The real science behind Scientology seems to be an understanding of the very human need, as social animals, to be part of a supportive group—and the willingness of people to pay handsomely for it. (Scientific American: The Real Science behind Scientology, by Michael Shermer, Oct 12, 2011).

The official general treatment of injuries as recognized by Scientology is a monumental contradiction of medical science. Hubbard explained that the purpose of a touch assist is to

… unlock the standing waves that are small electronic ridges of nervous energy that is not flowing as it should.

Here is actual audio of Hubbard discussing the concept of one aspect of the touch assist which requires the patient be returned to the scene of the injury and … well, just listen for yourself.

This treatment for pain is discussed at length in Scientology’s online Handbook, a humorous read for any thinking person.

The purpose of a Touch Assist is to reestablish communication with injured or ill body parts. It brings the person’s attention to the injured or affected body areas. This is done by repetitively touching the ill or injured person’s body and putting him into communication with the injury. His communication with it brings about recovery. The technique is based on the principle that the way to heal anything or remedy anything is to put somebody into communication with it.

http://www.scientologyhandbook.org/assists/sh6_4.htm

To read this entire explanation is an epic study of the ludicrous, or to be more blunt … just plain asinine. Naturally, a claim like this should be demonstrable on a wide scale but aside from the random testimonials of people actually helped by this medical “wonder,” there is NO PROOF ANYWHERE that this has helped anyone. Like I’ve asked the phony faith healers … how about showing up at Egleston Children’s Hospital and let’s go room to room with this wonder cure!!

This theory which, surprisingly, is actually referred to as “THEORY” on the Scientology Handbook website. It is found exclusively in Hubbard’s ramblings and has no medical foundation whatsoever. Much of what is currently being exposed in the news about Narconon stems from this medical nonsense that Hubbard blabbered about in his nonsensical writings about medical science (ironic, is it not, that they are so far removed from ANYTHING scientific?). A thorough discussion of Narconon as a junk science is presented here.

Again, from the Scientology Handbook:

FROM SCIENTOLOGY HANDBOOK:
If a person has received an actual injury to the head such as being poked in the eye or hit on the head with a bat, he can be given a Touch Assist. The same applies to injuries to the teeth or painful dental work.

The Touch Assist is easy to learn and can get quite remarkable results. It has the advantage of being easy to teach others. So use it well to help those around you, and teach them to help others in turn.

One of more insane pieces of nonsense that Scientology merely wizzes by in their quest to deify this Chief of lunatics was his claim regarding the treatment of radiation sickness or even burns:

“Scientology is the only specific (cure) for radiation (atomic bomb) burns.”
– L. Ron Hubbard, ALL ABOUT RADIATION, p. 109

“We are today the only people whose processes will actually cure or handle, in any way, shape or form, atomic energy burns … you get some guy’s case in order, and then you can cure his radiation burns with fair rapidity. More work has to be done on this, but I can tell you right now that it is the one thing that does something about it. Gives us a monopoly. More importantly, it gives us this interesting position. Just being able to cure this makes us the only civil defense agency on the face of Earth today. Think of that for a minute. Because no other agency has the knowledge or equipment to even vaguely handle it.” [Hubbard, “Aims and Goals of Scientology”, lecture of 14 February 1956]

I am only assuming that this this medical knowledge stems from Hubbard’s extensive research as a nuclear physicist.

For an extensive review of Scientology’s history involving the practice of medicine, check out this page at Xenu-Directory.net

From Publishers Weekly — The farce continues in this fifth installment of Hubbard's 10-series, Mission Earth. Soltan Gris, the focus here, is the Voltarian Empire's spy chief on Earth. Forever plotting, peeping and trying to manipulate others, double agent Gris is himself the eternal dupe. His crazed schemes to subvert his own agent in the field, virtuous Jettero Heller, keep blowing up in his face. The new chapter, a spoof of free market economics, opens with Gris smuggling 12 tons of goldto pay his credit card bills. Fast-talking bankers soon relieve him of the lucre and he fumes to see Heller raising money for his good deeds from mob-run Atlantic City casinos and commodities trading. This leaden satire gets more outrageous in its sexual aspects, which sound suspiciously like a parody of Scientology.

From Publishers Weekly — The farce continues in this fifth installment of Hubbard’s 10-series, Mission Earth. Soltan Gris, the focus here, is the Voltarian Empire’s spy chief on Earth. Forever plotting, peeping and trying to manipulate others, double agent Gris is himself the eternal dupe. His crazed schemes to subvert his own agent in the field, virtuous Jettero Heller, keep blowing up in his face. The new chapter, a spoof of free market economics, opens with Gris smuggling 12 tons of goldto pay his credit card bills. Fast-talking bankers soon relieve him of the lucre and he fumes to see Heller raising money for his good deeds from mob-run Atlantic City casinos and commodities trading. This leaden satire gets more outrageous in its sexual aspects, which sound suspiciously like a parody of Scientology.

Tony Ortega at The Underground Bunker has found a wonderful video featuring L. Ron Hubbard lecturing in 1954 about something referred to as “Opening Procedure by Duplication, Problems and Solutions and Granting of Beingness.” It is described as follows on Scientology’s Bridge Publications web site:

L. Ron Hubbard had delivered five ACCs at a scorching pace: 317 lectures in 147 days. Despite increased auditor skill, none could match his results. Seeking why, Mr. Hubbard made a crucial discovery—Duplication. “Auditors can’t duplicate. What do you mean, duplicate? That’s just, do the same as. That’s all. Can’t do it. What’s the matter with cases? They can’t duplicate.” Not only is duplication the basic action of existence, but its failure is the primary degeneration of a thetan. Thus Mr. Hubbard taught the solution in Procedure 30, comprising three processes: Problems and Solutions, Granting of Beingness and Opening Procedure by Duplication.

L. Ron Hubbard lectures on Duplication

If you’ve never heard of the phrase, “Psychobabble,” then you’re in for a treat because this is Hubbard at his gobbledygook best presenting information that any thinking person would immediately get up and walk out on. And yes … the longer you read this, the more convoluted it becomes.

Hubbard’s transition from writing goofy science fiction to writing goofy psychological analysis may have caught on with folks whose minds were already wired to accept just about any crazy idea coming down the highway, but for the rest of us it’s just nonsense … pure nonsense.

Oh yes, if you’d like a copy of this lecture series that Hubbard delivered to the 6th American Advanced Clinical Course, it will cost you a cool $550.

Duplication is tremendously important. Tremendously important. It just can’t be overemphasized in a case. —L. Ron Hubbard

So ... was he crazy? Well, here's one of the claims he made on the benefits of Scientology.  Leukemia treatments:  “Leukemia is evidently psychosomatic in origin and at least eight cases of leukemia had been treated successfully by Dianetics after medicine had traditionally given up.  The source of leukaemia has been reported to be an engram containing the phrase 'It turns my blood to water.’ ”

So … was he crazy? Well, here’s one of the claims he made on the benefits of Scientology. Leukemia treatments: “Leukemia is evidently psychosomatic in origin and at least eight cases of leukemia had been treated successfully by Dianetics after medicine had traditionally given up. The source of leukaemia has been reported to be an engram containing the phrase ‘It turns my blood to water.’ ”

The story of Hubbard and the Blackfeet is one that’s been told for years. According to official Scientology biographies, Hubbard, born in 1911, spent a short time on his grandparents’ Kalispell ranch when he was a boy. During that time, he claimed to have befriended a Blackfeet medicine man named “Old Tom” who taught him tribal lore and made him a “blood brother” in a special ceremony.

The story of Hubbard and the Blackfeet is one that’s been told for years. According to official Scientology biographies, Hubbard, born in 1911, spent a short time on his grandparents’ Kalispell ranch when he was a boy. During that time, he claimed to have befriended a Blackfeet medicine man named “Old Tom” who taught him tribal lore and made him a “blood brother” in a special ceremony.

Wacky L. Ron Hubbard … in his own words:

On his Native American upbringing …

It seems L. Ron really, and I mean really, wanted to make it clear that he had some extraordinary credentials when it came to his understanding of spirituality. And what do most of us require in a spiritual leader? Nothing less than full membership in a Native-American tribe.

Lucky for L. Ron, the Blackfoot Indian tribe of Montana recruited him and made him a blood brother in a really cool tribal ceremony that probably featured a whole lot of feathers and peace pipes and dancing and whatnot. And, oh yeah, that was when he was just six years old. Those injuns must have really recognized great perception and timeless wisdom in little L. Ron when he wasn’t crapping his pants.

And then, as if his followers wouldn’t be crapping their pants in excitement over his Blackfeet Indian connections, L. Ron also insists that he spent his adolescence sitting at the feet of shamans of the Orient, eventually applying their ageless wisdom to produce–TA-DA!–Scientology.

But Actually:

L. Ron lived in Helena, Montana when he was four. The nearest Blackfoot Reservation was over 100 miles away. Still, he could have made the trek for the blood brother ceremony … if the Blackfoot tribe ACTUALLY CONDUCTED that sort of ritual. But oops, they didn’t. As our friends at Wikipedia point out:

“The white Blackfeet historian Hugh Dempsey has commented that the act of blood brotherhood was ‘never done among the Blackfeet,’ and Blackfeet Nation officials have disavowed attempts to ‘reestablish’ Hubbard as a ‘blood brother’ of the Blackfeet.”

Hat tip Kristi Harrison, posted at Cracked.com

Tony Ortega is formerly editor of The Village Voice. He has written about Scientology since 1995. He’s currently working from an undisclosed location in an underground bunker (a term which began as a running joke at the Voice, and continues in all seriousness at his blog). His blog at The Underground Bunker is the most up-to-date and relevant reporting source available for all things Scientology. In this recent post, he concludes an interview with Jon Atack, a former Scientologist and author of A Piece of Blue Sky, one of the very best books on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology. In this segment Jon describes how Scientologists…

Jon Atack wrote A Piece of Blue Sky, outlining the history and practices of the notoriously secretive church and its founder.

Jon Atack wrote A Piece of Blue Sky, outlining the history and practices of the notoriously secretive church and its founder.

…internalize L. Ron Hubbard’s toxic policies of Disconnection and Fair Game.”

Scientology is a system of thought reform. It addicts adherents, so that they become willing to sacrifice everything to it, in the hope of supernatural powers and the risible belief that they will otherwise lose their immortality. While boasting of their liberation, members become ever more dependent. Phobias are induced against any other belief system, and, most of all, against the scientific exploration of the mind. While pretending to be scientific, Dianetics and Scientology have produced not a single proof of their many exaggerated claims. No proof that cancer can be cured, that IQ can be raised or that paranormal powers can be achieved. Indeed, the only study conducted by Hubbard, in 1951, failed to recover a single “engram.” He speaks of the use of “pain drug hypnosis” in this attempt in Science of Survival.

As it is, Scientology induces a “reactive mind.” Adherents become incapable of analysing problems, instead resorting to “thought terminating cliches” (in the words of Robert Jay Lifton). Rather than considering evidence, they will spout slogans. The engrams that populate this reactive mind are Hubbard’s own notions: “The way out is the way through,” “the speed of the particle flow alone determines the power,” “what you fear you become,” “absolutes are unobtainable,” “make it go right.” On and on, these unconsidered maxims pour forth, until no original thought is possible, because it would be “unethical” to disagree with the Great OT, and he has pronounced on almost every subject from running an intergalactic organization to cleaning windows. Suffice it to say that experience shows that smearing printers’ ink from newspapers onto glass is not an effective cleaning method. So much for the Technology.

Check out Tony’s blog and catch the rest of this great post here.

For more information, listen to this recent audio interview (September 2013) with Jon Atack at ABC’s Australian affiliate here.

Bare Faced Messiah

Independent US publisher Silvertail Books is putting out Bare-Faced Messiah in America. It’s website describes the book as telling the story of “a penniless science fiction writer who…became a millionaire prophet and convinced his adoring followers that he alone could save the world”.

Russell Miller’s book, Bare-Faced Messiah: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard, after 27 years is now being published in the U.S. the New York Post reports:

For example, the legend promoted by Scientology said that L. Ron Hubbard had grown up breaking wild horses as a child on his grandfather’s Montana ranch, which took up fully a fourth of the entire state. Miller showed instead that Ron’s grandfather was “a small-time veterinarian who supplemented his income renting out horses and buggies from a livery barn.” The family actually led an itinerant existence, moving repeatedly after Ron’s Nebraska birth in 1911 until they ended up in the Pacific Northwest.

The legend said Hubbard had made extensive travels to Asia, where the budding teenaged philosopher communed with holy men and mystics who had great respect for the young American’s precocity.
Miller found instead that Hubbard had made two trips to Asia while his father was stationed in Guam and made observations that were pretty typical for a teenager. In Beijing in 1928, Hubbard noted that the Chinese could make millions if they turned the Great Wall into a roller coaster. But ultimately, he was unimpressed with the country, writing in his journal, “The trouble with China is, there are too many chinks here.”

Read the whole story here.

Pick up a Kindle edition here.